Amusing Literary Terms #2 - Muphry's Law

| No TrackBacks
Muphry's Law

John Bangsund of the Society of Editors (Victoria) in Australia identified Muphry's law as "the editorial application of the better-known Murphy's law" and set it down in 1992 in the Society of Editors Newsletter.

The law, as set out by Bangsund, states that:

    (a) if you write anything criticizing editing or proofreading, there will be a fault of some kind in what you have written;
    (b) if an author thanks you in a book for your editing or proofreading, there will be mistakes in the book;
    (c) the stronger the sentiment expressed in (a) and (b), the greater the fault;
    (d) any book devoted to editing or style will be internally inconsistent.

It goes on to say:

    Muphry's Law also dictates that, if a mistake is as plain as the nose on your face, everyone can see it but you. Your readers will always notice errors in a title, in headings, in the first paragraph of anything, and in the top lines of a new page. These are the very places where authors, editors and proofreaders are most likely to make mistakes.

Source - Wikipedia

No TrackBacks

TrackBack URL:

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Perry Middlemiss published on August 2, 2012 9:14 AM.

Nicki Reed Interview was the previous entry in this blog.

Reprint: A Chat with Mr. Fergus Hume is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Monthly Archives

Powered by Movable Type 4.23-en